Bottle Advice Needed

steve07

Well-Known Member
#1
A Friend showed me a Bottle Dump that has been used from 1890 - 1955.
It measures 187 feet long, 30 feet wide and 6 feet deep approx. It was a Hunting Camp from 1890 -1920!!!
I guess when the hunting was bad they got pretty liquored up...


What is the best approach to attacking this Treasure Trove. At least 75% of the bottles are intact!!!:bthumb::bthumb::bthumb:

I have never dug bottles before....
 
#3
A Friend showed me a Bottle Dump that has been used from 1890 - 1955.
It measures 187 feet long, 30 feet wide and 6 feet deep approx. It was a Hunting Camp from 1890 -1920!!!
I guess when the hunting was bad they got pretty liquored up...


What is the best approach to attacking this Treasure Trove. At least 75% of the bottles are intact!!!:bthumb::bthumb::bthumb:

I have never dug bottles before....
i would definetly wear me some cut proof gloves you never know when you dig down get glass thats been on some bloody lips so too speak and contract soome disease from the bottles just my word of advise but it wil be nice too se some of them bottles cleaned up :alcoholic:alcoholic
 

Digging Fool

Well-Known Member
#4
I always used an Army shovel, with smaller tools for the "intricate" work at removing them. Sometimes the older bottles can be packed pretty tight in the ground. Small screwdriver and big screwdriver will work. Hadn't dug a bottle in years, but it sho' was fun!
 

steve07

Well-Known Member
#5
Hurry up and wait

I'm at the discretion of the Property Owner, a nice enough guy but, he likes to go a snails pace on anything (His Wife's words not mine.) It may be a week or two before we get to this big bottle dump. He is an Artist by trade and wants information on the best way to tackle it and a general idea if it will make him any money digging the "Old Bottles" up and selling them. I told him it depends on age and quality. He showed me a few Whiskey bottles from the 30's and they looked good. There was a date stamped on one, and the other two looked to be the same age.
 

dogpound

Well-Known Member
#6
alot of the "bigger" bottle dumps i've dug were in coal ash which made it fairly easy diggin, what we used to do was just carefully start diggin down, almost cutting steps to get down deep (where the oldest bottles are) make sure you clear a decent area around you and be aware of possible cave-ins. we'd use a 3 pronged garden hand rake lookin thing, shovel and small diggin tool (something like you'd carry detecting) sometimes this was a slow process depending on the amount of bottles in a location. to clean them we'd rinse, soak and then use shotgun shell BB's and dish soap for the inside of the bottles(shaking the BB's inside the bottles with water)
 
#7
i would take my time start at one end and slowly work your way down the trench digging and tossing broken bottles and trash behind you if it is on a sloap work up hill that way gravity helps you move some of the stuff. Will it make you money possibly. if he is artsy make some bottle trees or other crafts out of plain colored or worthless bottles. wear gloves and long sleves because you will get cut scratched and poked. the deeper you dig the older it will probably get even when you think you are at bottom dig a foot or so further to make sure it wasnt capped off or something if you have time build a sifter and sift the dirt for coins marbles toys and small items. most people that dig dont dig for the money they dig for the fun you can find a honey hole and make some good money buy you are going to find out alot is just old glass. a bottle can be 100+ years old and be worthless. If the bottle has a peal like finsih to it you are more than likely not going to get that off with out a bottle tumbler. i hope thins gives you a little more information. would love to see some pictures. Most important dont dig alone if you can help it and dont dig a tunnel with a lot of over burden as it can fall with out any warning trapping you or worse. Most of all have a good time looking at history from the common mans point of view
 

Mich49

Well-Known Member
#8
Good advice above. Gloves/boots/kneepads go slow because some of the OLD bottles can be of thin glass and as such easily broken. Plus you may spot items such as coins jewelry etc that just seem to fall into your hands. A shaker table is easily made buy building a square of 1x4s and adding wire mesh to the bottom securely (mines about 3/8 inch holes in the mesh I guess) it catches most bullets,marbles,all coins, and tokens. Just put a scoop or two of material on it shake it vigorously and see what you have! Good luck.