Can you customize a detector?

#1
Hi All,
This is my first post...glad to be here. Lately I've been thinking about meteorites, and that's brought me here. Looks like you have to be able to go 'deep' and use very large coils do do that. I'm a programmer, so the first questions I had are how to customize or 'beef up' my detector.

Custom Coils: Do people make them for their BH (or other) detectors? assuming one was made and wired to the plug properly, how would the internal circuits handle a 20" coil?


Data interface: Are there any detectors that have any sort of data-out jack, so I might be able to receive the ping or beep as data into software?
(and send it into my GPS as a waypoint?)

-I can already send waypoints to the GPS via my laptop, and could maybe specify the depth as 'altitude'... I'd just need a MD that can output data instead of just a speaker.


Thanks for any opinions you guys can offer!
-Jerry


P.S: My MD is an older BH Quick Draw II, but I could upgrade if a data interface or custom-coil option exists on another unit.
 

EBCIII

Well-Known Member
#2
Welcome to the site! Glad to have you on!

As an answer to your question, I will say this. For what you are looking at you could buy a nice new ACE 250, IMHO, Beale.
 
#3
Welcome to TQ. Wow sounds like you have some knowledge that will lend itself well to experimenting with new ideas.
I dont know anything about this firsthand, but I believe Minelab makes a machine that provides a connection to a pc. You might go to Kellycos website and look at the high end Minelabs. They are one of the sponsors of this forum and I think you can find a link to them at the top.
Look around I know there is a machine out there with an output feature that may get you started.

Another idea may be working with the speaker/headphone output from your machine and A/D converter set up.

If you could develop simple hardware to allow the interface from any machine it would have much more appeal to the average hunter.
Good luck and keep us informed of your progress.
 
#4
Sounds like your after high tech, there is a couple detector manufactures out there using this technology but they are very pricey. OKM uses an on board data collection unit which can be transferred to your pc. All measured data will be stored in the internal memory and can be transferred to a normal computer to evaluate and determine depth, size and position of targets with our optional software Visualizer 3D.

http://www.kellycodetectors.com/okm/exp4000.htmNokta Engineering is another one using a Ground Penetrating Radar, I think they actually use Linux OS.

http://www.kellycodetectors.com/nokta/nokta_buy.htm
 

homefire

Well-Known Member
#6
See If I have this Right!

You want to Take the Audio pump it through a ADC sample , Run it through a Algorithm, pick out wanted targets and log all the same in a catch memory, able to save on a flash drive?

The Bounty Hunter is a formidable machine for the money but not worthy of those additions.

You would not have the Needed Software to hack into the TID info to do it that way.

All of that is on a PROM some place in there and can not be changed.

You may be able to drive your program off the TID display but again that would be more work then you want.

Best to start from scratch and build your own.

Do you have the Programing skills?

:icon_cool

 
#7
After my first post, I found that minelab. It's unfortunate that it's taken this long for a MD to have data output.

I have a CS degree, but do database work as of late...not intimidated by sending data to/from a COM port though. Here's what I was thinking I'd try with my QD, although I know my QDII is not worthy of this experiment :)

Minimally, all I really want to do is ping my pc with a depth integer when I get a hit. So if I walked in a straight line across a field and had 5 hits, my COM port might get: 5.......8.......2...2......5. (why only depth? I don't want to confuse, but I could send that as a waypoint's altitude to my gps via the other com port)

Even if I could intercept the integer's 'signal' inside my detector, I'm unsure of the components required (decoder? mux?) to convert it to a voltage/format required for RS-232 transport.

The QD has an LCD that estimates Depth and another with material. I was thinking I'd ignore the material but try to capture the depth integer.
-If the integer is calculated inside the LCD housing I'll forget the whole thing..assuming I"m hosed.
-If it's sent in on a wire harness, I'd be open to a solution to splice in a circuit to send the integer out an rs-232 wire.

I'm going to open it up in the next couple days and figger out if those numbers are calculated on the board (might work), or if it's happening inside the LCD's sealed housing (I'm hosed)
 
#9
Homefire, I may end up building my own. I found a site (geotech1?) with schematics, parts lists and SMT boards. I may contact the guy there and ask what he thinks of a data out option.

I just don't know if those designs surpass my QD's capability, and wanted to save my self some time if I could tap into my QD and grab the signals.
 

tabdog

Active Member
#11
After my first post, I found that minelab. It's unfortunate that it's taken this long for a MD to have data output.

I have a CS degree, but do database work as of late...not intimidated by sending data to/from a COM port though. Here's what I was thinking I'd try with my QD, although I know my QDII is not worthy of this experiment :)


Minimally, all I really want to do is ping my pc with a depth integer when I get a hit. So if I walked in a straight line across a field and had 5 hits, my COM port might get: 5.......8.......2...2......5
. (why only depth? I don't want to confuse, but I could send that as a waypoint's altitude to my gps via the other com port)

Even if I could intercept the integer's 'signal' inside my detector, I'm unsure of the components required (decoder? mux?) to convert it to a voltage/format required for RS-232 transport.


The QD has an LCD that estimates Depth and another with material. I was thinking I'd ignore the material but try to capture the depth integer.

-If the integer is calculated inside the LCD housing I'll forget the whole thing..assuming I"m hosed.
-If it's sent in on a wire harness, I'd be open to a solution to splice in a circuit to send the integer out an rs-232 wire.

I'm going to open it up in the next couple days and figger out if those numbers are calculated on the board (might work), or if it's happening inside the LCD's sealed housing (I'm hosed)


Hay Jerry,

Metal detector depths are not that dependable.

That is where we use our analog brains,,, lol

They work well with coins, but have problems with odd size
iron type objects with varying size and iron content (meteorites).

You can set a way point in seconds as you recover the target.
Having an automatic data down load seems like over kill, big time.

Forget the Quick Draw II. It does not even have ground balance.
You would have to build a whole new unit.

For a cheaper deep iron seeker, I would consider the Schonstedt
model GA-52Cx magnetic locator,



It cost about $650. It does not cover a lot of ground, but, if you walk
by a good size space rock, it will pick it up deep. It will not work on
gold, silver or copper, brass and so on. Only ferrous metals.

Do you really need to carry all that communication and PC stuff out
there to hunt meteorites?

I would worry about finding one before I would worry about locating
and documenting stuff.

Happy Huntin,

Tabdog


 
#12
And what will all that get you! Whistles and bells will not help you find a meteorite.
Since most meteorites that are recovered are of a iron and nickel composition, people hunt in the all metal mode. Your are better off spending your time doing research (knowing where the fall zones are, is the land open to detecting, ect.), getting a detector with a ground balance system not preset like your BH, most manufacturers make large coils for depth but remember the deeper the recovery the larger the item must be to detect in the first place. Detectors made for prospecting, not have a prospecting mode, are perfect for meteorite hunting. Data on meteorite fields can be found through Arizona State or U of Arizona, as both have study groups.
Hopefully it is private land because the government says all meteorites on government land belong to the Smithsonian. :bow:
 

tabdog

Active Member
#13
And what will all that get you! Whistles and bells will not help you find a meteorite.
Since most meteorites that are recovered are of a iron and nickel composition, people hunt in the all metal mode. Your are better off spending your time doing research (knowing where the fall zones are, is the land open to detecting, ect.), getting a detector with a ground balance system not preset like your BH, most manufacturers make large coils for depth but remember the deeper the recovery the larger the item must be to detect in the first place.Detectors made for prospecting, not have a prospecting mode, are perfect for meteorite hunting. Data on meteorite fields can be found through Arizona State or U of Arizona, as both have study groups.
Hopefully it is private land because the government says all meteorites on government land belong to the Smithsonian. :bow:
Hay NH Smith,

I go along with with most of what you say, but, prospecting
detectors are far from perfect, or even a better choice for
meteorite hunting.

They do fine with harsh soils and find shallow space rocks ok.
I would think an F-75 would be a better choice.

I bet most of you guys do not know much about Schonstedtes.

I have dug iron pins past 4 feet deep with them. They won't
find your gold, but a prospecting detector can not touch it
for finding iron objects.

It is cheaper than the top end prospector machines also. They
are not very versatile, but I believe you will have to go real high
dollar before you can meet it's equal for meteorites.

I used them for over thirty years.

I dug so many iron rocks in my life, I just feel sure I tossed a
space rock or two while surveying.

I think about all the rocks I threw away a lot.

Oh well. No use crying over spilt milk.

Happy Huntin,

Tabdog



 
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