Chinese Dragon copper coin

Discussion in 'Coin Values' started by Catbird707, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. Catbird707

    Catbird707 New Member

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    Hello! This is my time posting but I am very glad to have found this group.

    I have several coins I am trying to identify but the one particular one I am working on now is the reason I am writing.

    Here is the information I have found so far.

    This is a Tai-Ching-Ti-Kuo Copper Coin

    The obverse has four Chinese symbols within a beaded circle. NO center symbol.

    Outside of the center circle there are four(?) very worn symbols at the top, one symbol on each side and five symbols at the bottom. The outer edge is also beaded.

    The reverse has the dragon but it is worn so I cannot make out any words. The Dragon is within a beaded circle. The outer edge of the coin is also beaded. Between the center circle and the outer edge of the coin are the words Tai-Ching-Ti-Kuo Copper Coin plus four(?) symbols.

    I understand that Ti-Kuo means empire and believe this coin would have been minted around 1900, however, since there is no center symbol on the obverse side (which is the mint mark?) I wonder if this is a fake or fantasy coin.

    Sorry that I can't submit a picture yet. I hope my description was clear enough. The coin is larger than an American quarter.

    Any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    Catbird
  2. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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  3. Catbird707

    Catbird707 New Member

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    Chinese Coin

    :wave: Hi Pappy! I think I do need additional sites. The site you gave me was where I got all the information I have so far. It's the fact that there is no center symbol on the obverse side that i can't figure out.

    Any other sites would be greatly appreciated!

    And by the way, I grew up in Virginia and have travelled alot throughout the eastern half of this great country. The Blue Ridge :bow: has been and will remain my all time favorite area. I'm in Louisiana now and really miss Virginia. Of course Louisiana has mountains, too. They are called OVERPASSES!!! :lol:

    Catbird
  4. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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    Coin

    WILL send you some more soon....PAPPY:bthumb:

    P.S. SURE WISH you could send a photograph...PAPPY
  5. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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  6. Catbird707

    Catbird707 New Member

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    Chinese Coin

    :multi: Pappy! You got it!

    Tai-Ching-Ti-Kuo means Great Ching Empire, Ching being the emperor. The date is represented by one symbol at the 3:00 position and one at the 9:00 position on the obverse side. The date is based on the ***agenary cycle. Mine is equivalent to 1907. The cash value is ten wen (ten cash).

    No mint mark appears at the center of the obverse because it was produced in Tianjin. Coins produced in any area besides Tianjin bear a mint mark.

    How cool! I'm delighted. Thanks for your help. The exact coin appears on the second web site you sent me.
  7. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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    GLAD to be of a little help....Nice coin....PAPPY:bthumb:
  8. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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    Chinese Dragon Coin

    CATBIRD.....I FOUND A TEN CASH TODAY MADE OF BRONZE FROM THE HUBEI PROVINCE. Mine is the one right above yours in the web site I gave you...I'll post a pic of it tomorrow...PAPPY:bthumb:
  9. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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    Bronze Coin

    Here is the one I found yesterday on a creek bank....PAPPY:bthumb:

    Attached Files:

  10. Catbird707

    Catbird707 New Member

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    Chinese Dragons

    Wow! That's really awesome. I wish I remember where I got my coin. Actually I had quite a few of a variety of coins put away to find out about later. I had no idea any were that old or that interesting. Yours looks a bit little thicker? Hard to tell by the picture. And yours does indeed have a mint mark. I'll have to look up the history on that one. I don't know about you but I'm having a lot of fun with this! :lol: Nice coin back at ya!
    Cathi
  11. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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    THANKS CATHI...I'm researching mine now......HAVE FUN:spin: :spin: :spin: PAPPY
  12. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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    Ten Cash Hubei Province

    Bronze coins valued at 10 cash (the old coins with a central square hole) or one cent were first minted during the 26th year of Guang Xu (1900) in Guangdong and eventually spread to fifteen bureaus in fourteen provinces by 1905. The reverse design consisted of a variety of dragons, the number of different types being estimated at circa 350. Some of these coins were minted in brass, presumably from melted down cash coins. Smaller numbers were produced with values of 20, 5, 2 and 1 cash and are consequently much harder to find.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Above: Ten Cash coin of Hubei Province​
    In 1905, the designs were changed, replacing the emperor's name with the Chinese characters for Da Qing ("Great Ching") and the two characters either side with Tong Bi ("bronze coin"). These new coins were in four different denominations, valued at 20, 10, 5 and 2 wen (cash) of standard bronze coins and weights of 0.4, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.04 of a tael. These Ta Ching coins, and those that followed, are slightly larger and thicker than the earlier milled coinage. They were first introduced by the Tianjin mint, now renamed as the General Mint of the Ministry of the Interior and Finance, with the reverse legend in English TAI-CHING-TI-KUO COPPER COIN and the emperor's name above in Chinese characters. Similar coins were produced in the provinces. Most bear two Chinese characters, one either side of the obverse denoting the date based on the ***agenary cycle. In the example illustrated below these characters appear in the 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions on the obverse and are equivalent to 1907. Coins produced other than in Tianjin usually bear a small mintmark character in the centre of the obverse on a raised circular disc.
    PAPPY:bthumb:
  13. PAPPY

    PAPPY Active Member

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    Your Coin I Believe

    CATHI, I believe this may be your coin...Correct me if I am wrong....PAPPY:smile:
    In 1905, the designs were changed, replacing the emperor's name with the Chinese characters for Da Qing ("Great Ching") and the two characters either side with Tong Bi ("bronze coin"). These new coins were in four different denominations, valued at 20, 10, 5 and 2 wen (cash) of standard bronze coins and weights of 0.4, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.04 of a tael. These Ta Ching coins, and those that followed, are slightly larger and thicker than the earlier milled coinage. They were first introduced by the Tianjin mint, now renamed as the General Mint of the Ministry of the Interior and Finance, with the reverse legend in English TAI-CHING-TI-KUO COPPER COIN and the emperor's name above in Chinese characters. Similar coins were produced in the provinces. Most bear two Chinese characters, one either side of the obverse denoting the date based on the ***agenary cycle. In the example illustrated below these characters appear in the 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions on the obverse and are equivalent to 1907. Coins produced other than in Tianjin usually bear a small mintmark character in the centre of the obverse on a raised circular disc.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Above: Ten cash coin marked "TAI-CHING-TI-KUO COPPER COIN"​
  14. Catbird707

    Catbird707 New Member

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    Chinese Dragons

    :smile: Yup! The second one is mine. Not nearly as pretty as your find but hey! I'm happy!
    Cathi
    :spin:

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