Digging tool from lowes

#1
Just out of curiousity while in lowes today, I walked through the shovels and garden tools.I purchased an ames true temper digger that resembles those high priced jobs for about $12.00 and a sheath for $7.00.Its stainless steel and has a slight curve ,its built very sturdy .Has teeth on one side and a sharp blade on the other.I figure it will be a good starter.Anyone here ever see one of these?
 
#4
Sound great. Can you post a photo of them? We have lesch tools but always looking to expand. Thanks:wavey:
Sorry,I cant post a pic right now.But if you go to AMES.com and look for the planters buddy under hand tools you will see it.Its probobly not the same quality as the leche,but for cheap,you cant go wrong.
 
B

boobieinPa

Guest
#6
Starhunter had one of the ones from Lowes. It broke off at the handle. He took it back and they said to return it to the mfg.
 
#7
Starhunter had one of the ones from Lowes. It broke off at the handle. He took it back and they said to return it to the mfg.
Ok Boobie just a question or two.How much use did he get out of it before it broke? How did he break it off at the handle? Must have been in some dry rocky dirt,this thing feels strong.For 12 dollars youre not going to get the quality of the leche predator tool.My point is that I beleive that its a good tool for the money.I,m going to put it through the wringer for ya :bthumb:
 
B

boobieinPa

Guest
#8
He had it for about 2 weeks. The ground wasn't that hard and it did break right at the handle.

I certainly agree with you that for the money it is a darned good digging tool.
I mean lets face it anything that is man made will break sooner or later.

I have one for my Ace 250 setup. The only difference is on mine I ground it to a point and put a seared edge on the opposite side.
I like it but like you said it is not the quality of the Lesche.

George Lesche is a good friend of mine and I can say that I know about the quality that he puts into each and every tool he builds out there in N.J.
 

The TINMAN

Well-Known Member
#9
Got One

Has one sharp staight side, one Serated side ( really sharp ) Numbers 1" thru 12" from tip to top of handle, forked tongue like edge at tip of blade for cutting roots, and a line or twine gutter at top of straight side. I've had this for a year and have put it thru it's paces in the hard ground and no problem with it. Thumbs Up from me. :bthumb: If mine breaks, I'll buy another. After a years use, For the price, Ya can't beat it.

The TINMAN
 

JCWhite

Active Member
#10
I bought one for about 12 bucks in Ohio in August at the Buckeye hunt. I really liked the tool but when I was up in Indiana 3 weeks ago hunting with WhitesDFX it snapped right in the middle of the blade. I will buy another one but will be a little more careful with it. I feel the same way about the Fiskars knife from Walmart. It is a good tool but does not hold up over the long run.
 
#11
Yea I use the Fiskars from Wally World and love it, been using it about six months now but I DONT pry with it because I now it's not built that well. Although I reaally would love to have one of the better tools I just haven't seen the need YET to pay the price. Then again I am a City Employee. I'm used to working with low bid equipment. LOL
 
M

mlamp20412

Guest
#12
I am on my 2nd Friskars. It broke down in the handle after some prying. W-Mart let me grab another one, no problem (great thing about the mart).
My wife got me a Predator Lesche digging knife as a gift and it is awsome.

Either way your not hurting yourself too much financially. One cheaper tool every 6 months or a $30-40 Lesche every 3 plus years (I see it lasting forever, but for arguments sake).

The main plus for the Lesche is I feel I'm less likely to be out in the sticks and have my only digging tool break, ending my outing. My time out is too valuable.

HH-
 
#13
Garden Gate Knife/sheath

GG

Go to my post @ Detecting Tips (digging Tool) I just got this knife & it is awsome, I have been useing it down on my lake which has a very, very rocky shoreline and it has been holding up great.
It also cuts very neat plugs. Hope this helps. there is a pic. with the post
 

EBCIII

Well-Known Member
#14
I have the Ames tool and the Lesche. I actually like them both. The Ames IMO cuts the roots easier than the Lesche. The Lesche digs better. I allways carry both of them, both work well, Beale.
 
#15
Digging tools (long and kind of a rant)

Frankly, I've not been very impressed with any digging tool I've seen or used over the thirty plus years I've been detecting. In my opinion, quality has been sacrificed for 'cheap' and you get what you pay for.

One feature I'm always reading about is the 'serrations' on one side of the trowel that are supposed to cut through roots. These have very seldom been effective for that purpose for two reasons: First, the 'serrations' do not have a true saw 'set' to them and usually wind up just bumping over the root ( I should add that I've only attempted to cut roots 3/4" in diameter at the most. The rest I try to dig under or around). Second, the steel I've seen used in any trowel I've seen is either not heat treated properly (to maintain an edge) or not heat treated at all. The non-saw part of the trowel gets dull so fast, that the blunt edge really has to be forced through the sod to start the cut. Frequently, that makes a bigger mess of the turf, which I really try to avoid. I'm sure that as with many things these days, what I would call necessary features, aren't there so as to keep costs down. Even expensive trowels bend, break, get dull and have been unwieldy to use.

Another problem is that with detectors finding targets deeper than ever before, new designs are necessary to recover them effectively. Some members of my club approach this issue by digging a wider plug, so their trowel has digging clearance. I don't like this 'solution' as the wider the piece of sod you disturb, the greater the odds of the turf dying and leaving a big brown patch...not good for the hobby!

I solved this problem for myself by making my own. But I have an advantage over most as I make knives for a living and have the equipment to grind and heat-treat my own steel for its intended purpose, and then build it. No, I'm not writing this to sell my trowels. It takes a lot of time to grind one out of 1/4" steel, heat treat it and put on a decent handle. I don't think even a niche market would pay for the effort. I've made a few for my hunting buddies and of course I have a few for myself, but they would be priced out of range for most people to buy.

My point in this rant(?) is that even if someone could mass produce it, few people would be willing to pay for it as we live in a throw-away society and have been conditioned to expect product failure or a short useful product life. That's pretty sad.... We detectorists deserve better! There just aren't enough of us to get someone interested in making quality recovery tools.

Now I know some will reply that they are perfectly satisfied with "brand x" or whatever type of digging tool, and that they've use one for years, and that's fine. However I've tested the best out there and they just don't measure up, at least for me. I'd rather not have to take the time to make them even for myself, as my time could be spent making a hunting knife, or pocket knife, that would sell for more money.

We spend $500 to $1000 and up for a quality metal detector and then settle for a tool costing $12 to $50 (which has to do some REAL work) and end up buying many over the years we detect. I really wish some mfgr. would step up and offer some better equipment.

Again, this is based on my testing, and actual use of almost every digging tool (trowels in particular) I've been able to find, excluding the obviously cheap and fragile ones. I haven't and won't mention brand names here as I don't want to knock anyone's business. Its the manufacturer's with whom I have an issue.

Knipper
 

pris

Active Member
#16
Excellent post, Knipper. We would all love to see your work! I tend to agree with you, but don't know if I could find the resources to spend a whole bunch of money for such a nice tool. I'd probably be afraid to scratch it up if I spent over $100 or $200 on a trowel. I'm sure I would love it, as would anyone, but as you say, we're all pretty conditioned to buy something that we know will fail at some point.

Well stated!
 
#17
Just out of curiousity while in lowes today, I walked through the shovels and garden tools.I purchased an ames true temper digger that resembles those high priced jobs for about $12.00 and a sheath for $7.00.Its stainless steel and has a slight curve ,its built very sturdy .Has teeth on one side and a sharp blade on the other.I figure it will be a good starter.Anyone here ever see one of these?
I bought one last week and bent the blade that eve (it's really dry here right now) took it back the next day and got a 'gel-e trowel'(made by oxo) from lowes. So far it has held up really well (still hard/dry ground)!
Be Safe...Be Happy!!!
 

DougsGraphics

Well-Known Member
#18
I still like my combo of tools. I use a drywall saw to cut the plug and a solid cast aluminum trowel to pry/pop it out or to dig. I sharpen the trowel a bit from time to time, as well as the drywall saw. Of course, the problem is that rocks tend to eat away the teeth on the saw at the rate of about one saw per season. Not a bad trade off. It works for me after I broke several different trowels\shovels\knives\etc in the first few months of detecting.
 
#20
Picture Please

Hey Knipper :wave:

Could I impose on you to show us a picture of your invention. It's kind of hard to visualise what improvements you've created. :confused:

Thanks
Leo :wavey:
 
Top