Digging tool from lowes

#42
Ames planters buddy

Hello,

I'm new to TQ but wanted to help out with an opinion on the Ames tool. I have been using a planters buddy for 2 years. I had purchased 2 tools one for my wife for gardening and one for myself for mding. I have used mine for 2 years without any problems. I dig, cut plugs, cut & saw off roots. It is a great tool. My wife, a master gardener loves hers too. My father uses the $30.00 Lesche tool made for mding but I don't see any difference. :bthumb:
 
#43
El Cheapo Tool

I being the newbie I am, went to Home Depot to find myself a little garden trowel to do the business end of things. I browsed around, seeing everything from $4 tools to ~$15 tools. I figured, a little shovel is a little shovel and sprung for the $4 tool. It works allright in some pretty soft stuff that's in a spot I tried out...but otherwise it reminds me of trying to get really frozen ice cream out of the bucket with a teaspoon...little bit flexible, haha. Oh well, cheap lesson. When winter goes away and I get more serious, I'll spring for something a little more robust...

-Chris
 

The TINMAN

Well-Known Member
#44
A Good Digger is well worth the Money ! try the One from Lowes for $15.00. I've used the same one for 2 years now and No problem at all and will get into some pretty tough ground.
 
#45
I have also been using the ames digging tool all summer. It seems to be a great tool for mding. It is ruggedly built- thick blade, solid construction, good grip, tamper end. It is versatle- digging through roots, prying up rocks, and cutting through many different types of soils with ease. And best of all- relatively inexpensive with a lifetime warranty. I am extremely pleased with the purchase and am getting my Dad one for x-mas. My only gripe is it doesnt come with a sheath, but hey thats not a big deal. You can buy one or use another sheath you already have.
 

smartfox

Well-Known Member
#46
I have a digging tool

it has a blue handle, teeth on one side and sharp on the other. Paid 12 bucks and works great. I posted to you guys and send a pic of me sharpening the tool because it was a bit dull.:christmaswindow:
 
#48
Starhunter had one of the ones from Lowes. It broke off at the handle. He took it back and they said to return it to the mfg.
FYI I have a friend who is in managment at Lowes.
To get past the NO at the customer service desk ask for a manager. If the manager doesnt do the right thing let them know you are going to file an official complaint to corporate.
Chances are he will do what you need, because his bonus is effected by complaints.
Just FYI
 
#49
Way to go !! ALWAYS go higher up on the food chain, when you are not satisfied !!!! AND my ames digger has been in use for 2 seasons now, still going strong !! I have sharpened and put serrations in the smooth side as well (guess that voids my warranty) LOL My buddies wife had the fiskars orange handle digger, not long though, she snapped it in half !!, (now she has an ames digger) LOL !!
 
#50
Just out of curiousity while in lowes today, I walked through the shovels and garden tools.I purchased an ames true temper digger that resembles those high priced jobs for about $12.00 and a sheath for $7.00.Its stainless steel and has a slight curve ,its built very sturdy .Has teeth on one side and a sharp blade on the other.I figure it will be a good starter.Anyone here ever see one of these?
My first one did break off at the handle too, but I should have known cause I was prying way too hard with it. I picked up one of those heavy duty claw tools and a couple more of the $7 jobbers. Now if I can tell that I am putting too much pressure on the digger I use the sturdier garden tool to pull the plug out. My 2 cents
 
#51
Ok guys, I had broken 2 walmart cheapies and then decided to look around at my work and found something that's pretty decent. If you're starting out and want a decent tool that will hold up, this is what I've been using:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_07140106000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1




Garden Planter Tool

  • Versatile tool solves all your gardening needs
  • strong, long lasting stainless steel blade can be used for cutting sod and twine ( the steel does hold up very very well, very little to no bending as the blade is incorporated into the handle in one piece )
  • Serrated edge is perfect for opening bags of soil and gardening mix ( very sharp brand new, and if it dulls where it doesn't cut worth a crud , take it back and get a new one! )
  • Blade acts as a convenient measuring tool (1-4 inches on opposite side of blade in picture)
  • Comfortable wear resistant handle ( comfortable for its proper use )
  • Carrying Case included ( small leather belt sheath, one that can get cut by this tool easily if not careful )
* added my own opinions on there in the ( )


My only complaint with the tool is the grip/handle for metal detecting, but after finding out some decent ways to cut the soil with it, its not so bad for the money. Also the divot in the tip of the blade is sharp for cutting roots as you go into the soil. If I had to modify this tool to make it better, it would be: new handle/softer grip and sharpened pointed tip(s), but other than that, it works great. Here's the best part, its lifetime warranty, so if it does break, take it back to sears and they will give you a brand new one free of charge under the craftsman warranty exchange.

Can't beat that for $9.99 sale/$15 Regular.

Hope this helps some of you guys out there not wanting to break the bank on a digging tool.
 

Drenthe

Well-Known Member
#52
I use a collapsible shovel I bought at the Army/Navy surplus store. It works okay as long as it stays locked open.
Took me a week to snap off the shovel from the handle. I thought that since it was army surplus that it should give me good service and unfortunately they dont have a warranty. I really liked the fact that I could use the shovel like a hoe to go through the rocks along a shore line and I really wish it would have held up.
 

Drenthe

Well-Known Member
#53
Leo requested I post these....

The steel is 5160 heat treated to 'Banite' (a process by which you can get some steels to be both tough and hard enough to keep a decent edge...)

It's a bit over 14" long, and the steel is 1/4" thick from the bottom of the trowel portion to the start of the handle. From there to the end of the handle, I tapered the steel to a thickness of 1/8" at the butt end.

The top of the trowel is hollow ground with a radius of 10"; enough to serve as a scoop, but still flat enough to act as a cutting blade. the bottom of the trowel has two hollow ground sections at the edges, and is left thicker in the middle for prying strength. The handle itself is green canvas Micarta, which is layers of phenolic resin and canvas compressed together. Its pretty much indestructible, unless you throw the whole thing in a campfire overnight....moisture won't penetrate it though.

The 5160 steel is prone to rust, however. But thrusting it in and out of dirt really doesn't allow rust to build up. Besides, I take care of it and wash it clean followed by a light spray of WD-40 after use.

The way I use it, is to cut a 4" x 6" trapdoor in the sod, then push the trowel in to the front side of the 'door' as deep as I can (usually about 6") and then pry up the sod and dirt under the trap door. I can then use the trowel to keep cutting and prying dirt out of the hole until I get my target. If its a manicured lawn, I put down something to pile the dirt on so as not to leave a muddy smear on the lawn. I can usually recover coins to a foot deep with no problem. I like to keep the hole as small as possible, so I loosen the deep dirt with the trowel and scoop it out with my other hand.

If I run into a root (any larger than 3/4" and I leave it alone...) I just put the edge of the trowel against it and push. The trowel will usually cut through with one stroke, as I keep the edges very sharp.

Anyway, this has been my solution to all the tools I've used in the past that haven't held up. This thing is strong enough that you could drive it into the dirt to the bottom of the trowel portion, and then kick or push the handle with your foot and it will neither bend nor break. I expect this to last me a good many years of hard use.

Knipper
That looks like one heck of a plug cutter. Your skill is certainly obvious.
 

fyrffytr1

Well-Known Member
#54
I have been using the Lowe's tool for about 3 years now and it has held up just fine. I would like to find a way to put a magnet in the handle end.
 
#56
Magnet

I would like to find a way to put a magnet in the handle end.
This is the magnet I use...





WARNING! if you put this magnet on your fridge you will have to slide it across the paint job to get it off. This magnet does not budge (as you can see).

These bar mags are all over eBay - all shapes, sizes & prices. hth.
 

fyrffytr1

Well-Known Member
#57
That looks like a good idea. I would like to epoxy one into the end of the rubber handle so I could flip the tool over to pick up a magnetized object.
 

Glenn

Well-Known Member
#58
I used to have a knife, a hunting type, cheap for sure, made along the lines of a lower case Bowie Knife. I had a rapport with that knife. I used it for coin hunting and it was the best recovery tool for coins, etc I have heretofore used. I would give it a few licks on the stone from time to time, but it could do the job. If I had to move some dirt, that knife was up to the job. I could loosen the dirt and scoop it out by hand or I could just use the broad flat of the blade. Dang it all though, it got away from me when I made a move when I retired the first time around. I'm sure I left it in the cellar of my Alexandria row home down by the river side.

I have searched for a knife like that for a few years now on the internet and found bupkis. All I find is over priced junk. I don't care about the qualities that some people think makes a knife great. Heck I want mine to go digging in the dirt with. You know. Bounce off rocks. Be fiddle faddled if I'm going to pay $70-100 for a knife to be used for that. No Toledo swordmakers need apply.

I got some various tools now and I am working with those. I am going to make a more concentrated effort to learn the art of coin popping with a screwdriver. I've tried it before but never stayed with it long enough to become proficient.
 
#59
Diggin'

the art of coin popping with a screwdriver.
I've been practicing this technique with no success. It seems the key is to get an absolute pin-point location and the best I can do is to get within a 3"-4" radius. I poke and prod around until I have gouged an unsightly hole in the lawn. I think I'll stick to my own lawn with this method until I perfect it. That way I won't turn all the local parks into dirt lots.

By the way - I've used this knife as a digger in the past and it will stand up to anything out there. Harbor Freight - $8.99 + 20% off today. There's a lot of steel there.
 

DBG

Well-Known Member
#60
I've been practicing this technique with no success. It seems the key is to get an absolute pin-point location and the best I can do is to get within a 3"-4" radius. I poke and prod around until I have gouged an unsightly hole in the lawn. I think I'll stick to my own lawn with this method until I perfect it. That way I won't turn all the local parks into dirt lots.

By the way - I've used this knife as a digger in the past and it will stand up to anything out there. Harbor Freight - $8.99 + 20% off today. There's a lot of steel there.
That's kinda what I've been looking for. I used to use the large K-Bar Marine knife, It did a good job, Well I left it in the desert at NTC (FT. Erwin Ca.) in 1995 and I ain't going back to look for it. LOL :lol:,:icon_wink The desert ain't no place for a HILLBILLY :bthumb:
 
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