Gold and Mica

#1
Ive now found Mica in Quartz and thousands of flakes of Mica on land in Dahlonega, so much if you stick your hand in the red dirt it looks like your hands covered in gold dust !!!
Could there still be gold with so much Mica on the land and in the streams or am i chasing fools gold .
Is it common to find both together ?
All help would be appreciated thanks .

Lee
 

r49miner

Active Member
#3
First off you can have gold and mica in the same area. Yes you can find gold in rivers that have mica but it will not be on top. Gold is one of the heaviest things in the river. With the movement of the water Gold will work it's way to bedrock if it does not hit a hard layer on the way down. If you have any kind of heavy winter flows, gold sinks that much faster.
 
#5
Hey Homefire,
Rocks for kids LOL.
If i'd have read and had absorbed this when i was a kid i think i mite have a better job than a HVAC Engineer by now !!!
I'll look a little closer tomorrow when i've a little more time to see if i can find the correlation between the two .
Just a thought as anybody ever stopped off at one of those jem shops on the way home from gold panning !!!
We stopped off at one and they was selling quartz.
Small pieces 2 to 3 inches long for $3 and one large that was sold for $900.
On my fiancees family land at that rate we spotted at least 20 $500 pieces of quartz and tons of 2 to 3 inch pieces.
Now that's what i call a quartz gold mine LOL .
 

homefire

Well-Known Member
#6
:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

No Pun intended. Thats just the way it is.

The more colors , COLOR ROCKS you see in the gravels your working the better the chances of Gold.

Red, Green, Quartz White, Pink and More.

:bow:
 
#7
I've been to Dalongea. I worked at the creek at a mine and the mica made the creek look like a glistening stream of gold.

Mica is very shiny and brittle, gold is actually dull. Fool's gold is something different again. I've seen Mica in Georgia and North Carolina. In North Carolina, I mined for rubies and sapphires. Mica was found with garnet beads.

Mica, quartz, fool's gold and gold can all be found together. It doesn't take long to differentiate. Put your dirt in water and the mica will generally float, the gold will go to the bottom. Gold can be found in strings in quartz. You can have the quartz crushed if you want the gold or just put it in a jewelry setting.
 

r49miner

Active Member
#8
I've been to Dalongea. I worked at the creek at a mine and the mica made the creek look like a glistening stream of gold.

Mica is very shiny and brittle, gold is actually dull. Fool's gold is something different again. I've seen Mica in Georgia and North Carolina. In North Carolina, I mined for rubies and sapphires. Mica was found with garnet beads.

Mica, quartz, fool's gold and gold can all be found together. It doesn't take long to differentiate. Put your dirt in water and the mica will generally float, the gold will go to the bottom. Gold can be found in strings in quartz. You can have the quartz crushed if you want the gold or just put it in a jewelry setting.
Gold will float also right out of the pan.
 
#9
floating gold

thats why you pan in a tub with alittle bit of JET-DRY ,,,in it ...it breakes the surface tension of the water so your fine gold wont float on top,,,
 

Attachments

#11
One little sweat bead from your wrinked brow...gone, like Elvis and his mom! Like Al Pacino's cash...you get the point. Soap is your friend. Regarding mica, I've dug until the overburden was clear of mica before I found gold of any size. Very fine black sand can have loads of mica in it, but the gold wont be thar. plumber
 
#12
The vermont streams I pan in, all have lots of mica,and quartz. There is also serpentine (a green rock), magnetite, hematite, garnets, shale, etc. Get down on the bedrock, scrape up some material and see if theres any gold. test several areas in a stream before giving up, may be more gold in one stretch than another. I look for rusty red quartz, coming out of serpentine bedrock, the gold has a tendency to be where the quartz and serpentine meet, along the edge of where the two have formed.
 

too_pointer

Well-Known Member
#13
I have to read this room more often, there is sure lots of great advice I see in here. I live in Michigan, and heard the Upper Peninsula has gold, don't have a clue where, but am planning a trip there this summer, to look around. Thanks guys for the info. :smile::smile:
too_
 
#14
Hey, good luck to you,

Remember those old prospectors found an estimated 10th of the gold geologists believe is still out there...and those sourdoughs were packing picks...not state of the art metal detectors!!! plumber
 

homefire

Well-Known Member
#15
Hey, good luck to you,

Remember those old prospectors found an estimated 10th of the gold geologists believe is still out there...and those sourdoughs were packing picks...not state of the art metal detectors!!! plumber
Some of the old Tailing's are quit good!

They just chucked the stuff that shown no colors. :bthumb:
 
#17
Thanks for replies,
I'll be back looking for gold when i move to Georgia end of March.
This also ends my beach hunting after my honeymoon not for good, just for now !!!
Lets hope my prospecting's just as good :bthumb:
 
#18
First off you can have gold and mica in the same area. Yes you can find gold in rivers that have mica but it will not be on top. Gold is one of the heaviest things in the river. With the movement of the water Gold will work it's way to bedrock if it does not hit a hard layer on the way down. If you have any kind of heavy winter flows, gold sinks that much faster.
Mica is really a whole host of minerals, muscovite, biotite and chlorite being the most common. Mica is soft and can be distinghed by it perfect cleavage, which means the mineral breaks into very thin sheets. It is easily eroded to form clay minerals. Mica is abundant in silicic igneous rocks and is the main component of many metamorphic rocks (add enough heat and pressure to clay and it becomes mica). Schist is a metamorphic rock composed almost entirely of mica. :oops: :coffeecup
 
#19
gold and mica...

Yep it sure can. I was just at the GPAA outing in Ga this summer and you're right about the mica dust - my car still glitters...... but there is still gold there - its just (or so I found) very fine flour gold. its duller than the mica (looks kinda like bronze) and it is heavier so while it will still get swirled in the pan, it does do it slower than the mica. Try panning raw material down to concentrates, then slowly pan the concentrates - a smaller pan really helps here. To process a fair amount of material I really would suggest getting a sluice - even a little EZ sluice will give a big increase in production.
 
#20
Ive now found Mica in Quartz and thousands of flakes of Mica on land in Dahlonega, so much if you stick your hand in the red dirt it looks like your hands covered in gold dust !!!
Could there still be gold with so much Mica on the land and in the streams or am i chasing fools gold .
Is it common to find both together ?
All help would be appreciated thanks .

Lee
Mica is really a whole host of minerals, muscovite, biotite and chlorite being the most common. Mica is soft and can be distinghed by it perfect cleavage, which means the mineral breaks into very thin sheets. It is easily eroded to form clay minerals. :redface:
 
Top