How To Find Old Town Dumps

#21
:wavey: Hi, An Interesting Thread Is Never To Old. I Pretty Much Have Enough Knowledge To Find Old Dumps. I Also Think I Know Where Some Are But They Are Off Limits. One Of My Main Questions Was Has Anyone Ever Seen An Old Dump Indicated On A Map? Hey Your Post Was Very Interesting Though. Thanks JJ
 
#24
Digging dump bottles

:pmad:Hey there JJ..I am a legend in these parts for bottle digging..They call me quick lightng Lu.I have been digging for many years now in a few counties around these parts.Its all in research.If you put the effort in.I mean really put the effort in.You can find those old bottles.It starts with an hour session of meditation.You have to focus on what type and age of the bottles your pursuing.Going to your local library aint gonna give you SQUAT!!!! You have to knock on doors and talk to people..Let them know who you are.And what your gonna do..The'll listen..One time in my younger years I asked this old timer about a dump I researched on his property and wanted to do a little probbing.He said theres no dump on my property.Well when I showed up the next day with a backhoe and dump truck.He was very pleased to find out he had some valuable bottles on his property.After a month of heavy excavating we finally finished the job.I thanked him and told him there would be no charge and I might return the following year to check the back forty..You see.......You have to firm.Put a bage on and tell em' your from the historical bottle foundation..It works I'm tellin ya...I'll give my first tip on finding the goodies later on..this post
 

schoser

Well-Known Member
#26
:pmad:Hey there JJ..I am a legend in these parts for bottle digging..They call me quick lightng Lu.I have been digging for many years now in a few counties around these parts.Its all in research.If you put the effort in.I mean really put the effort in.You can find those old bottles.It starts with an hour session of meditation.You have to focus on what type and age of the bottles your pursuing.Going to your local library aint gonna give you SQUAT!!!! You have to knock on doors and talk to people..Let them know who you are.And what your gonna do..The'll listen..One time in my younger years I asked this old timer about a dump I researched on his property and wanted to do a little probbing.He said theres no dump on my property.Well when I showed up the next day with a backhoe and dump truck.He was very pleased to find out he had some valuable bottles on his property.After a month of heavy excavating we finally finished the job.I thanked him and told him there would be no charge and I might return the following year to check the back forty..You see.......You have to firm.Put a bage on and tell em' your from the historical bottle foundation..It works I'm tellin ya...I'll give my first tip on finding the goodies later on..this post
i really like this guy thats a good idea!
 
#27
I have run into this before. Generally old dumps 1920'-1970's before regulation were town owned. Having closed these dumps what do you do with the land. It is too contaminated to sell. Most were turned into city parks, city halls, fire stations or yes many were turned into schools. You can also look on the EPA site. Search "Brownfields". These sites are generally high in all sorts of fun stuff like mercury, asbestos, benzine etc. Do not put anything you find in your mouth from these sites. Clean cloths thoughouly afterward. I lived in NJ and the list was huge!

Ownership of these sites is iffy. Some state, some town, some federa and some who knows? In jersey if it is state or town go nuts, if you glow afterward your problem.

Hope this helps.
 
#28
in Ga. what worked for a good friend of mine was he looked for the old logging towns and he found where the railroad line ended in the woods and then he would metal detect and probe till he found the dump for the temporary logging town and let me tell you he SCORED on these every time. He just sold 26 blob top cokes for an outrageous amount.He`s in his 70`s and has been sitting on them for years.No kids so it was time to let some go. good luck.

Old churches from the turn of the century that had outhouses are Fantastic places to look.
 
#29
No records for old bottle dumps?

I have also looked for maps for 20 years that show dumps, with no luck. It seems impossible for city dumps to not have been recorded. The only recorded info I could find is for 1940,s or newer dumps. I even went to the Library of Congress, which has the biggest map collection on earth, but they had nothing with dumps showing. I tried reading old news papers from around 1910 to see if I saw any mention of the town dump, with no luck. I've searched for dumps in over 100 towns and only found about 8 of them. Maybe they are being kept secret, so the arcaeologists of the future will still have a place to dig.
 
#30
One of the biggest bottle dumps I know of in this area is behind the local cemetery. That was quite common place. Keep the dead and trash all together. That would help to contain most of the diseases of the past. That very well could be why you don't see them on the maps. Ever walk through a cemetery with a shovel? Swiz
 
#31
Finding bottle dumps

Farmers and folks (in the 1800's) in rural locations usually dumped their trash in a ditch, ravine, or small stream close to their home on their property. City folks almost always tossed the stuff in the privy. Alot of times they would do a house cleanout when they moved the privy. Finding one of these is gold! You almost never see a dump site on a map. I did see one obscure railroad map that showed a railroad dump. It's a good drive so I haven't had a chance to check it out yet. I want to get a few more spots picked out so if it doesn't pan out it won't be a total bust. Anyway, my best advice for finding a town dump would be to walk and detect along stream banks down wind from the town. And of course look for glass shards and junk in the stream bed itself. I happened upon a really good dump in central Ohio following a creek one day. I saw lots of glass shards in the creek and I looked for the biggest concentration of them. I followed the broken shards to a small steep ravine with a little feeder stream. Followed the feeder stream still seeing shards and maybe two hundred yards up this little creek was the jackpot. A hugh hillside dump that dated from the 1870's to 1920's or so. I've been thrown out of there at least six times over the last 25 years and I still sneak back in to see what the frost has turned up and sneak an hour or so of digging. There have been several owners of the property over the years and not one will let me dig. I even offered to bring in an open topped refuse bin and clean up the junk then reseed it. Still no luck. Alot of the bigger town dumps have been "Capped". Meaning they brought in a bunch of dirt ususally clay and packed it on top of the trash layer. These will require either equipment or alot of muscle to dig. I prefer the equipment myself. Photos are of a dig at a capped dump next to a railroad ditch. A few shards on top of the goround and a day of hand digging led to the discovery of this hugh dump that was capped off back around 1915 or so. Two digs with the "Dingo" produced about 500 "Keepers" and hundreds more plain unembossed bottles. We got several ten pin sodas, some straight side Cokes in clear and amber, some cobalts and some stoneware just to name a few. Names and places have been witheld to protect the um...innocent??
 

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Ric-san

Well-Known Member
#32
What a good posting this is...from my experience, you have to talk to old timers...When I was in High School I majored in Architecture. Our teacher had been a student at our high school back in the 1940's. It had been built in the 1930's on the site of a dump. That's all I knew from what he told us...the School is the third largest in the U.S and was built by the U.S Governments Works Progress Administration. Lane Technical H.S in Chicago, Il. I didn't think much of it, but once I got into detecting and hearing of bottle collecting, I talked to my Father in Law. He was a bottle digger back in the 60's-70's and we started to compare notes...he told me of all the local hot spots that have not been touched in years. He got away with murder (pun intended) as he was a Chicago city employee. He would find sites and take his crew between work, and give them each an extra 15 minutes of 'break' for each whole vintage bottle they found. So we get to talking about where my H.S was and in the where it was built. Turns out before the H.S. was there, the area adjacent to it was a theme park that dated from the 1900's until I was born in the mid 60's. The land had previously belonged to a wealthy German family. Don't ask me how the area next to a picnic grounds was chosen for a dump, but I think the Great Chicago Fire had something to do with it. There is now a 'River Walk' behind this area and some TQ members have posted some finds from this area...I cant to visit Chicago again soon...
 

pennystock

Well-Known Member
#33
i remember here in maine when i was a kid, we used to burn everthing in a 55 gallon drum out in the back 40, and the other stuff we took to the town owned dump and they burned then bulldozed it all under and now its just a landfill of grass that they will never sell.............looks good though.....
 
#34
what I forgot to ask or tell about was the Sanborn maps, I use to have the passowrd , it was common and everyone uesed but I hear they changed. Sanborn maps were from the insurance company and they gave you options of what time frame you were looking for for your town. I located 2 dumps and numerous privy`s here in my town from those maps. Most of the privy`s were in the yard of the homes which are now in a historical section of town and right on the outskirts of the business section of here.

very user friendly and now I need to know does anyone have the current password to log in with?
 

Mr.Silver

Well-Known Member
#35
Farmers and folks (in the 1800's) in rural locations usually dumped their trash in a ditch, ravine, or small stream close to their home on their property. City folks almost always tossed the stuff in the privy. Alot of times they would do a house cleanout when they moved the privy. Finding one of these is gold! You almost never see a dump site on a map. I did see one obscure railroad map that showed a railroad dump. It's a good drive so I haven't had a chance to check it out yet. I want to get a few more spots picked out so if it doesn't pan out it won't be a total bust. Anyway, my best advice for finding a town dump would be to walk and detect along stream banks down wind from the town. And of course look for glass shards and junk in the stream bed itself. I happened upon a really good dump in central Ohio following a creek one day. I saw lots of glass shards in the creek and I looked for the biggest concentration of them. I followed the broken shards to a small steep ravine with a little feeder stream. Followed the feeder stream still seeing shards and maybe two hundred yards up this little creek was the jackpot. A hugh hillside dump that dated from the 1870's to 1920's or so. I've been thrown out of there at least six times over the last 25 years and I still sneak back in to see what the frost has turned up and sneak an hour or so of digging. There have been several owners of the property over the years and not one will let me dig. I even offered to bring in an open topped refuse bin and clean up the junk then reseed it. Still no luck. Alot of the bigger town dumps have been "Capped". Meaning they brought in a bunch of dirt ususally clay and packed it on top of the trash layer. These will require either equipment or alot of muscle to dig. I prefer the equipment myself. Photos are of a dig at a capped dump next to a railroad ditch. A few shards on top of the goround and a day of hand digging led to the discovery of this hugh dump that was capped off back around 1915 or so. Two digs with the "Dingo" produced about 500 "Keepers" and hundreds more plain unembossed bottles. We got several ten pin sodas, some straight side Cokes in clear and amber, some cobalts and some stoneware just to name a few. Names and places have been witheld to protect the um...innocent??
do you own the machine? If so , you want to dig with me 50/50 I will split with U, U got to love dig as much as I do ! Later !

Mr.Silver:spin:
 
#36
It was a bit of work gathering up things that went to a dump site.First it would have to be loaded up and taken somewhere.Second it wouldnt involve as much work getting rid of it as it was loading it.Ive dug in many farm dumps that I found on the edge of a field or road that had a steep hillside or ravine near the edge.A horse or mule pulling a wagon to the edge of such a place where then the debris could be dumped over the edge and down the ravine out of sight.Search the ravines on the edges of fields and roadsides for broken chards of glass and start digging around.Get a topo map of your area and study it for spots like that and you will find dump sites.Im digging an old dump site now that is on the edge of a road down over a bank that was used in the horse and buggy days it goes back to the mid 1800s.There is stuff on top the goes back to the 1930s.The road now is asphalt and is heavily used.People are lazy when it comes to dumping trash.Its easy to pull over along a road and dump over a hill side.Find those quick and easy spots. That is where the bottle and scrap goldmines are.Back in those days people dumped evrything.Copper ,brass and all kinds of metal scrap.Good Luck I hope my tip helps any fellow diggers!