Interesting Archeology...The Medicine Wheel

teamroper

Well-Known Member
#1
Medicine_Wheel_Bighorn.jpg

Eventually one gets to the Medicine Wheel to fulfill one's life. - Old Mouse, Arikara
High in the Big Horn Mountains at nearly 10,000 feet above sea level, lies the Medicine Wheel (above) — a place of worship, a National Historic Site, and an archeological mystery.
It is believed that between A.D. 1200 and A.D. 1700, hundreds of limestone rocks were placed in the shape of a wheel roughly 80 feet in diameter. Twenty eight spokes radiate from a central cairn to six smaller cairns around the rim.
Who built this and why?
No one knows for sure, but Native American beliefs and archeological evidence point to its use as a spiritual site. Many people still come to the Medicine Wheel and Medicine Mountain for inspiration, solitude, meditation and vision questing.
The Medicine Wheel was given protection and nominated to the National Register by local Big Horn Basin communities. The site is protected by federal antiquity laws under administration of the Forest Service.
 

KRose

Well-Known Member
#2
Great post Roper. It is fascinating indeed as to how these ancient people were able to construct such a massive architectural design and lay it out from ground level. A lot of folks believe that aliens from up above helped and aided in doing this. In the Bible, Ezekiel who looked up and saw a wheel in the middle of the sky from whence the spiritual song came from is believed by many to have been a UFO witnessed by Ezekiel himself. I don't know if I believe this. It is still fascinating and makes one think. These designs, including the ancient pyramids too were obviously constructed. By who and how is baffling.
 

teamroper

Well-Known Member
#3
I've always been intrigued by the Native Americans and their culture. Actually, even more so now since my grandson is part Sioux Indian. I see a lot of his family on his momma's side and I'm very impressed on how tight knit the family is. Even though their "lifestyles" run from one end of the spectrum to the other, you have to give them a lot of credit. Even though my grandson is not really old enough yet to get the full understanding of what his ancestors were and what they are today, I've told him the basics and also that he needs to be proud of his heritage. I've also told the family exactly what I've told him so that if the subject ever comes up they know where it came from. My place is open to anyone in their family, anytime, and they know it. Hey, after all, they're his family too. (y)
 

KRose

Well-Known Member
#4
Very Well Said Jake. Through our American History we were taught or led to believe that the Native Americans (The 1st True Americans) were dirty stinking savages. Nothing was further than the truth. From the Native Americans came the Alphabet, the fore runner of the Hospital System (designating an area for the sick in the village away from the healthy.) Many different medicines and cures for the sick. The Native Americans were also a very spiritual people worshipping God in their version of sun, rain, harvest, etc. As we grew older and began to read for ourselves into the History of this country and the Native Americans we realized that the Native Americans were mainly one thing unfortunately for them. They were standing in the way of progress. So much for progress. For this we all know the heartbreaking truth of how their sacred lands were stolen out from under them. How they were forced off their lands and forced to live on reservations. Their hearts and spirit of a once Proud People being forever broken. What was done to these people was criminal then and is still criminal to me to this day. If you want to talk of a people who have grievances, look no further than the Native American People, yet, we seem to hear the least from them. We went years ago to Cherokee, North Carolina and visited the Ocoonaluftee (if I spelled this correctly) Indian village. Our tour guide was a college educated Cherokee Native American. This guide was very well educated and knew his peoples history and culture. We had in our group a heckler of sorts that was making off side comments just loud enough for folks to hear. The guide went on to talk about the Cherokee language. The heckler or Idiot (however one wants to view) asked the question. "How does one cuss out another in Cherokee?" The guide handled this so gracefully. He answered this after hearing more than one sarcastic remarks from this same fellow. "This cannot be done the tour guide explained, then or to this day." You see, the guide went on to explain that there are no curse words in the Cherokee language. In order to curse one, one would have to switch from Cherokee to English" and then revert back to Cherokee. The Cherokee people did not know the first curse word until the arrival of the white man. I could only imagine that there were a few choice fitting words for this one heckler going around in this tour guides mind, and rightfully so. (In English of course). It worked. The Idiot shut up after this. Bryton belongs to a PROUD race of people and has a strong heritage. It is only right that he learns this. You are raising him right Jake. And as far as the Native Americans being savages? Where did they learn the art of scalping? The white French settlers. The white race. It is truly a Shame what has been done to these people, for they were truly the First Americans. We could go on and on about the contributions that have been made by these people still in use today.
 
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