lost signals on the 150

Rob1960

Well-Known Member
#1
I have read reasons for losing a target, breaking the halo effect, etc., but let me run this by y'all. On an old ballfield a while back I had dug many pop bottle tops and a little clad. Hit a good signal at 6", dug my plug plus a few handfulls and placed on the drop cloyh. Check the hole with the coil (no pinpointer yet) no signal. Chek the dropcloth, ding ding. Pick up the loose soil a pass under the coil, nothing. Check the plug, nothing. Recheck the hole nothing. Pull the loose soil from the hole and put on the dropcloth, nothing. Look into the hole and there sits a shiny 63 Rosie. Why wouldn't the coil read it as I passed it under it or was barely covered as I evidently place the dime back in the hole. Last time at the ballfield Another 6" signal. Same procedure same results except I carefully sifted each handful as it went back into the hole and I never found squat. Yes I checked probably a 3 ft. area all around in case the target got flipped out. Any ideas or suggestions appreciated. Now I have to wonder what it is I may have lost.
 

homefire

Well-Known Member
#2
Bits of metal corrode to nothing but Ions and fragments.

You found one.

After you move the stuff around it's history .

Welcome to my World.

TID numbers Lie. I can't believe how many folks believe in them.

Folks those numbers are about a certain metal in a certain shape at a certain distance.

They can not tell you what type of metal it is.

Gold rings can ring up as Nickles, Pull Tabs and even a Penny depending on what is alloyed with the Gold.

Some is Copper. Some is Silver. Some are even Aluminum. Brass or what ever they choose to use.

Don't fall into the TID Number Game.
 

mdpartner

Well-Known Member
#3
On my XLT it has a feature that automatically adjusts the settings for ground balancing during the hunt. It is called Autotrack. You have the ability to turn it on or off. I have found the constant proximity of the target will in effect mask the target on occasion. In fact, to pinpoint more accurately the manual suggests that you purposefully keep your coil over the target and it will reduce the signal return area so you can better pinpoint the target.

After a battery change when I turn my detector on, it goes into ground balance mode. On mine it is raise the coil to waist level then pull the trigger and release. Second, lower the coil to ground level and again pull and release the trigger. The detector is ground balanced. Here is a quirk I have noticed. One day I balanced the detector and started swinging. I was finding nothing, not even a sound. I went to a Coke can laying in the grass and swung over it. It barely pinged. I balanced it again. This time I was getting the normal bleeps and blurps. On a hunch, I went back to the initial spot I ground balanced and swept the coil over it. I hit a Franklin 50 cent piece!

I figured I "balanced" my machine out of seeing anything because my coil was centered over that Franklin. It was so out of balance nothing was returning a signal. To prevent that from ever happening again I decided to change my procedure. I pull the trigger and hold it putting the detector in pinpoint/all metal mode and find an area where there is no detectable metal for at least a 2 foot diameter. This has really helped the depth too because there is a near perfect balance. I'm no longer balancing over any metal just ground.

A few times I have found my detector so out of balance it will not display a signal with the coil close to the ground. I picked the coil up about 6 inches and get a signal. No problem, just balance again and it works perfectly.

My point, your machine might have balanced it out.
 

Rob1960

Well-Known Member
#4
Bits of metal corrode to nothing but Ions and fragments.

You found one.

After you move the stuff around it's history .

Welcome to my World.

TID numbers Lie. I can't believe how many folks believe in them.

Folks those numbers are about a certain metal in a certain shape at a certain distance.

They can not tell you what type of metal it is.

Gold rings can ring up as Nickles, Pull Tabs and even a Penny depending on what is alloyed with the Gold.

Some is Copper. Some is Silver. Some are even Aluminum. Brass or what ever they choose to use.

Don't fall into the TID Number Game.
Thanks, Homefire. Yes I've heard about the small crumbly pieces but I had a rosie within inches of the coil for sure that time. The 150 doesn't have numbers, Idon't think the Ace series does either. I haven't found gold yet but my 10k wedding band rinds in on coin. It took a little while to figure out not to get it to close to the coil when checking plugs.
 

Rob1960

Well-Known Member
#5
On my XLT it has a feature that automatically adjusts the settings for ground balancing during the hunt. It is called Autotrack. You have the ability to turn it on or off. I have found the constant proximity of the target will in effect mask the target on occasion. In fact, to pinpoint more accurately the manual suggests that you purposefully keep your coil over the target and it will reduce the signal return area so you can better pinpoint the target.

After a battery change when I turn my detector on, it goes into ground balance mode. On mine it is raise the coil to waist level then pull the trigger and release. Second, lower the coil to ground level and again pull and release the trigger. The detector is ground balanced. Here is a quirk I have noticed. One day I balanced the detector and started swinging. I was finding nothing, not even a sound. I went to a Coke can laying in the grass and swung over it. It barely pinged. I balanced it again. This time I was getting the normal bleeps and blurps. On a hunch, I went back to the initial spot I ground balanced and swept the coil over it. I hit a Franklin 50 cent piece!

I figured I "balanced" my machine out of seeing anything because my coil was centered over that Franklin. It was so out of balance nothing was returning a signal. To prevent that from ever happening again I decided to change my procedure. I pull the trigger and hold it putting the detector in pinpoint/all metal mode and find an area where there is no detectable metal for at least a 2 foot diameter. This has really helped the depth too because there is a near perfect balance. I'm no longer balancing over any metal just ground.

A few times I have found my detector so out of balance it will not display a signal with the coil close to the ground. I picked the coil up about 6 inches and get a signal. No problem, just balance again and it works perfectly.

My point, your machine might have balanced it out.
Point well taken I guess thats a possibility. Next time I'll move away from the area and come back or turn it off and back on again. (auto ground balance on the 150)How do like the XLT? There's one for sale locally but at the price I could get a new AT Pro..
 

mdpartner

Well-Known Member
#6
Let me put it this way. I have a friend I hunt with. He has an XLT, a V3, a DFX, a Fisher, a Minelab, and a Tesoro. He starts his hunts with one of these then always finishes with the XLT.

I have another White's QXT also that is just sitting because I can't get the money I paid if I sold it.

I just love my XLT. It has a lot of features that can be programmed to function like different machines. It has a feature I wish other detectors had. A VDI range of -95 to +95 and the sound varies its pitch to match.
I can adjust the programming to suit different sized coils. I use a special one for my 3.5 sharpshooter coil and can pick out a coin an inch away from a pulltab or nail.

If I find myself in an open field where there is not much metal, I have a "berzerk" program that is so hot it will detect a BB at 8 inches. I have found wheats at 12 inches and a Barber dime at 14 inches with this.
 

against the wind

Well-Known Member
#7
I have literally dug thousands of coins since getting my AT PRO in June of this year. I have lost only one target since using it. It literally disappeared. I offer no explanation. Sometimes you have to abandon the target and move on. That was on land. In salt water the game changes and I have to depend on both audio and visual signals. The numbers you respond to, that you would normally ignore on land, could turn out to be a gold chain. (48) On land that number has never turned up a good target for me. :cool:
 

DBG

Well-Known Member
#8
Ya'll have "kinda sorta" hit on one of
Mine and homefire's pet peeve's
LEARN THE SOUNDS AND WHAT
THE DETECTOR IS TRYING TO TELL YA.
I very seldom look at the vdi
until after I have determined if it's
a Good target or not by the Sounds
;):D
 
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