MODERN DAY RESEARCH

against the wind

Well-Known Member
#1
We have come a long way since the day of sitting in the library for hours on end. That is how I used to try to gather information on a potential search site. Today with the Digital Camera and the Personal Computer, our time searching for information has been reduced to almost nothing.
Here is an example of how I weigh the possibilities of finding silver coins and older tokens, jewelry, and items of days gone by.
I picked a park that is on the list of parks that we are allowed to hunt on our NYC permit. The park I picked at random is McCarren Park in the neighborhood of Greenpoint, Brooklyn. I then visited the park and walked the perimeter, taking pictures of some of the surrounding buildings. Church, High School, Apartment Buildings, and cross street signs. All will give up the age of the neighborhood and the volume of human traffic. I take pictures of any areas that may have been overlooked by past searchers. The little grass islands between the concrete sidewalk and the curb are prime areas for items dropped while entering or exiting a car, especially at night or while there is snow on the ground. Both conditions make it difficult to find a dropped item. It is all documented on my camera.
I then take a walk inside the park and take pictures of all the spaces that will give up some goodies. The sports field, picnic areas, shaded groves, waiting areas around public toilets, lawns closest to entrances to schools and churches, etc. This particular park has a public pool and there was a second entrance to the rear of today's entrance. Twenty or thirty pictures and I'm done.
Then it is computer time. After downloading the pictures it is a simple matter of punching in a few requests, High School and Church names, and a few addresses of older residential building. The closest subway station will also give you an idea of how much more accessible this neighborhood became after the station was built and opened. Don't forget, prior to mass transit, the trolley car and horse & carriage was the turn of the century way of getting around. A subway, (Train), will give people the opportunity and convenience of travelling to the city for work and other needs. Once a subway station opened in an outer borough neighborhood, it's population grew in leaps and bounds.
Here is some of the information I was able to come up with. Starting with information on Wikipedia, I was able to uncover the fact that McCarren was first known as Greenpoint Park prior to 1903. During this time period, NYC was buying up land for the purpose of creating parks. The park was purchased in 1903, and in 1909, it was renamed McCarren Park.
(McCarren was a N.Y. State Senator who had lived in the neighborhood)
IMG_6973.JPG

The land was being used as a park prior to 1903, I'm thinking maybe a few Barber dimes or Indian Head Pennies, are waiting to be found.
IMG_7010.JPG

This neighborhood church was established in 1916, with this structure being built in 1922. How many picnics were held by Sunday church goers in the park, right across the street?
IMG_7012.JPG

The neighborhood was growing as is witnessed by the information that I got when I punched in the addresses of these residential buildings. 563 Manhattan Avenue was built in 1928 and 623 Manhattan Avenue was built in 1931.
IMG_7041.JPG


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This local Butcher shop serves a predominately Polish neighborhood
IMG_7042.JPG

The Nassau Avenue Subway Station opened in 1933. It is only one block from the park.
IMG_7044.JPG

The Automotive High School opened in 1937. By now my thought are about Mercury Dimes and Standing Liberty Quarters.
IMG_6992.JPG

It goes without saying that the huge older trees were probably the first shaded areas used by neighborhood residents to try to escape the pre-air conditioner days and evenings.
IMG_6986.JPG

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Little Grass Islands that may hold a Walking Liberty Half that was dropped while exiting a car at night.
IMG_7003.JPG

The Works Progress Administration built the park pool in 1936.
IMG_6974.JPG

These partially destroyed brick columns are all that remain of the once gated rear maintenance entrance to the pool.

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Hope you guys enjoyed a trip through the history of the park and it's surrounding neighborhood. Hopefully my next pictures will include some excellent finds that I hope to make this coming Friday.
Here are a few results from a 6 hour hunt,
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IMG_7144.JPG
 
Last edited:

swamp yankee

Well-Known Member
#10
We have come a long way since the day of sitting in the library for hours on end. That is how I used to try to gather information on a potential search site. Today with the Digital Camera and the Personal Computer, our time searching for information has been reduced to almost nothing.
Here is an example of how I weigh the possibilities of finding silver coins and older tokens, jewelry, and items of days gone by.
I picked a park that is on the list of parks that we are allowed to hunt on our NYC permit. The park I picked at random is McCarren Park in the neighborhood of Greenpoint, Brooklyn. I then visited the park and walked the perimeter, taking pictures of some of the surrounding buildings. Church, High School, Apartment Buildings, and cross street signs. All will give up the age of the neighborhood and the volume of human traffic. I take pictures of any areas that may have been overlooked by past searchers. The little grass islands between the concrete sidewalk and the curb are prime areas for items dropped while entering or exiting a car, especially at night or while there is snow on the ground. Both conditions make it difficult to find a dropped item. It is all documented on my camera.
I then take a walk inside the park and take pictures of all the spaces that will give up some goodies. The sports field, picnic areas, shaded groves, waiting areas around public toilets, lawns closest to entrances to schools and churches, etc. This particular park has a public pool and there was a second entrance to the rear of today's entrance. Twenty or thirty pictures and I'm done.
Then it is computer time. After downloading the pictures it is a simple matter of punching in a few requests, High School and Church names, and a few addresses of older residential building. The closest subway station will also give you an idea of how much more accessible this neighborhood became after the station was built and opened. Don't forget, prior to mass transit, the trolley car and horse & carriage was the turn of the century way of getting around. A subway, (Train), will give people the opportunity and convenience of travelling to the city for work and other needs. Once a subway station opened in an outer borough neighborhood, it's population grew in leaps and bounds.
Here is some of the information I was able to come up with. Starting with information on Wikipedia, I was able to uncover the fact that McCarren was first known as Greenpoint Park prior to 1903. During this time period, NYC was buying up land for the purpose of creating parks. The park was purchased in 1903, and in 1909, it was renamed McCarren Park.
(McCarren was a N.Y. State Senator who had lived in the neighborhood)
View attachment 87607
The land was being used as a park prior to 1903, I'm thinking maybe a few Barber dimes or Indian Head Pennies, are waiting to be found.
View attachment 87609
This neighborhood church was established in 1916, with this structure being built in 1922. How many picnics were held by Sunday church goers in the park, right across the street?
View attachment 87611
The neighborhood was growing as is witnessed by the information that I got when I punched in the addresses of these residential buildings. 563 Manhattan Avenue was built in 1928 and 623 Manhattan Avenue was built in 1931.
View attachment 87612

View attachment 87613
This local Butcher shop serves a predominately Polish neighborhood
View attachment 87614
The Nassau Avenue Subway Station opened in 1933. It is only one block from the park.
View attachment 87615
The Automotive High School opened in 1937. By now my thought are about Mercury Dimes and Standing Liberty Quarters.
View attachment 87616
It goes without saying that the huge older trees were probably the first shaded areas used by neighborhood residents to try to escape the pre-air conditioner days and evenings.
View attachment 87617
View attachment 87618
Little Grass Islands that may hold a Walking Liberty Half that was dropped while exiting a car at night.
View attachment 87620
The Works Progress Administration built the park pool in 1936.
View attachment 87622
These partially destroyed brick columns are all that remain of the once gated rear maintenance entrance to the pool.

View attachment 87623
View attachment 87624
Hope you guys enjoyed a trip through the history of the park and it's surrounding neighborhood. Hopefully my next pictures will include some excellent finds that I hope to make this coming Friday.
Here are a few results from a 6 hour hunt,
View attachment 87928
View attachment 87929
WTG in doing your research for a potentially great hunting ground.....
 

sandfisher

Well-Known Member
#16
I like the intensity of your research.
I've been using google maps this year and believe this is what has helped me find more jewelry than ever before.
It has helped me discover alot of old parks and parks in general that I never new existed.
Still waiting on gold and old silver coins but feel that with research it will happen.
Research is a big part of it.
Thank you for the great post.

sandfisher
 
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