Rail car connector pin?

Discussion in 'Ask TQ' started by fyrffytr1, Oct 29, 2017.

  1. fyrffytr1

    fyrffytr1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2010
    Messages:
    2,530
    Likes Received:
    5,248
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Fire Captain
    Location:
    Southwest Georgia
    This was a weird find today. It actually didn't register on my DFX but I found it with my pinpointer while looking for a small target. There were several pieces of trash above and around this piece so I guess they could have masked the signal. When I laid it on the ground and ran my detector over it the thing liked to have blown my headphones off my noggin!
    Anyway, it is about 16"s long and 2"s in diameter and is very heavy. I was told by one of my friends that it may be an old railroad car connector pin. 20171029_172546.jpg
     
    DigsNW likes this.
  2. DigsNW

    DigsNW Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2008
    Messages:
    17,794
    Likes Received:
    12,472
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired!
    Location:
    S.W. Washington
    Ours weren't quite that shape but it is a lot older too. I think that is what it is. The ones on our RR looked like a nail at the top not all that design.
    Called a knuckle pin.
     
  3. fyrffytr1

    fyrffytr1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2010
    Messages:
    2,530
    Likes Received:
    5,248
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Fire Captain
    Location:
    Southwest Georgia
    Thanks for the tip. I did a quick search and found two that are similar.From what I read they were used before the advent of automatic couplers.
    114.jpg
    old-antique-railroad-cast-iron-link-pin-coupler_1_5dbf65c183057855335853a3bbc5e9a6.jpg
     
    DigsNW likes this.
  4. against the wind

    against the wind Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2012
    Messages:
    23,555
    Likes Received:
    42,170
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    "Lost Treasure Detective"
    Location:
    Port Allegheny, Pennsylvania
    I just recovered on of those last week.
    One of the guys that I was hunting with told me that it was a hitch pin for a bulldozer. I went with that. Then after I posted it I was corrected by a member of that forum. It was used to couple railroad cars back when the lumber business in this part of Pennsylvania was booming.
    Congrats on your find.
    20171030_182102.jpg
     
    MJMcCallie and KRose like this.
  5. KRose

    KRose Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,708
    Likes Received:
    22,686
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Covington, Georgia
    I pulled a couple of these pins from our river down here a while back magnet fishing. Nice find.
     
    MJMcCallie likes this.
  6. fyrffytr1

    fyrffytr1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2010
    Messages:
    2,530
    Likes Received:
    5,248
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Fire Captain
    Location:
    Southwest Georgia
    I found mine at a Spanish/American war camp site. It's about 1/4 mile from the railroad tracks.
     
    KRose and MJMcCallie like this.
  7. fyrffytr1

    fyrffytr1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2010
    Messages:
    2,530
    Likes Received:
    5,248
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Fire Captain
    Location:
    Southwest Georgia
    What bait do you use when you fish for magnets?
     
    MJMcCallie, DigsNW and KRose like this.
  8. KRose

    KRose Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,708
    Likes Received:
    22,686
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Covington, Georgia
    I used a powerful magnet......so powerful that it remains on the floor of the river stuck to something Hewge!
     
    MJMcCallie likes this.
  9. DigsNW

    DigsNW Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2008
    Messages:
    17,794
    Likes Received:
    12,472
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired!
    Location:
    S.W. Washington
    Yeah, the big ones always get away.
     
    MJMcCallie and KRose like this.
  10. KRose

    KRose Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,708
    Likes Received:
    22,686
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Covington, Georgia
    I Dunno,........sometimes I just feel drawn to magnet fishing.
     
  11. MJMcCallie

    MJMcCallie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    5,105
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Sr RCT
    Location:
    Rockwood, TN
    Sounds like a big fish story to me! LOL
     
    KRose likes this.
  12. KRose

    KRose Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,708
    Likes Received:
    22,686
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Covington, Georgia
    It must have been one of those Steel fish the Yanks' talk about. Lol
     
    MJMcCallie likes this.
  13. DigsNW

    DigsNW Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2008
    Messages:
    17,794
    Likes Received:
    12,472
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired!
    Location:
    S.W. Washington
    NO, no, no, no. It is steelhead not steel fish! :LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL::eek: They mean and hard to cook and not very tender but my favorite fish of all of them.
     
    KRose likes this.
  14. fyrffytr1

    fyrffytr1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2010
    Messages:
    2,530
    Likes Received:
    5,248
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Fire Captain
    Location:
    Southwest Georgia
    If my research is right these pins are pre 1873. That's when the automatic coupler was invented. I know they were probably in use for years after that until the old cars were scrapped or converted

    Pin & Link Coupler.jpg
     
  15. KRose

    KRose Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,708
    Likes Received:
    22,686
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Covington, Georgia
    I would like to at this time offer my sincere apology........if I have offended any Steelhead Fish or Steelhead Fishermen.....or women, I am truly sorry. I reckon this was like calling our Crappy' fish down here Croppy'. No harm or insult was intended. I would like to add that there were no Steelhead fish or any other species of fish North, South, East, or West that were physically harmed .......only in name in the contents of this post. I can always count on my ole' buddy Dig's to call me down in the error of my ways. Lol :whistle:
     
    DigsNW likes this.
  16. DigsNW

    DigsNW Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2008
    Messages:
    17,794
    Likes Received:
    12,472
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired!
    Location:
    S.W. Washington
    The above picture fyrffytr1 is a very good picture. I am sure glad trains don't use that system any longer. The post 1873 knuckles that replace that oval ring are stronger but still crack and break once in a while. Air in a train works opposite than trucks as I understand it. I haven't worked around trucks only RR in this instance. Air in a train sets the brakes when taken out of the cylinder so if a train breaks for whatever reason the airline comes apart setting the emergency brakes. Trains cannot stop on a dime by any means though. Stopping distances are measured in 1/4 mile increments usually depending on speed at stop.
    Thanks for the old picture, I loved it.
     
    KRose likes this.

Share This Page