ring signals

DBQ Dave

Well-Known Member
#1
Hey all, Do gold and silver rings produce a consistent numerical signal? Is there any tricks of the trade in ring hunting? I use an ATP, and I plan to hunt old volley ball courts made of sand. They haven't been used in say 7 years, and they are right next to a bowling alley/bar.
 

majakldragon

Well Known Member
Staff member
#2
The ring will produce a consistent tone. Its best not to go by the numerical readings as they can vary due to soil composition.Train your ear to the tone the metals make, each is slightly different. If you depend on the numbers you will be disappointed and become frustrated rather quickly. There really is no magic formula or calculations that will find gold and silver. Its all due to being in the right place (where it was dropped) and a good deal of luck. Don't make it into a job, just have fun.
 

Orosurf

Well-Known Member
#3
The ring will produce a consistent tone. Its best not to go by the numerical readings as they can vary due to soil composition.Train your ear to the tone the metals make, each is slightly different. If you depend on the numbers you will be disappointed and become frustrated rather quickly. There really is no magic formula or calculations that will find gold and silver. Its all due to being in the right place (where it was dropped) and a good deal of luck. Don't make it into a job, just have fun.
I just read the last line :ROFLMAO:
 

Orosurf

Well-Known Member
#4
MD hit the main point spot on. "Its all due to being in the right place (where it was dropped)" This is rule number 1. I've never used an ATP but I suggest you should try it on a few sample rings and listen carefully, almost all rings vary slightly in size, shape and composition so they will almost never give the same id no. You will gradually learn which tones "might be" . Good luck
 

against the wind

Well-Known Member
#5
I have used the AT PRO. I have recovered numerous silver rings which usually come in at 83 to 85.
I also recovered 4 or 5 gold rings with it.
I remember the numbers that accompanied the gold rings and where the rings were found.
14K X 2, ladies white and yellow wedding bands. The AT PRO registered them at 63 both times.
14K men's yellow wedding band. Larger than the 2 previously mentioned ladies rings. The AT PRO registered it at 65.
These were all water finds.
18K men's yellow gold ring with onyx stone recovered from soil. The AT PRO registered it at 51.
So, as you can see, the numbers are going to vary. I have read posts where the PRO has recovered gold rings in the 40's.
There is a scale on the faceplate of the PRO that shows the range of gold targets.
Unfortunately that range also covers aluminum foil, pop tops, and can slaw. The saving grace is the nickel at 51-52.
There is no specific number assigned to gold targets, only a range of numbers.
You must always remember that the target may actually be multiple targets of different composition. That will also throw target numbers way off.
 
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DBQ Dave

Well-Known Member
#6
Thanks for the replies.
The ring will produce a consistent tone. Its best not to go by the numerical readings as they can vary due to soil composition.Train your ear to the tone the metals make, each is slightly different. If you depend on the numbers you will be disappointed and become frustrated rather quickly. There really is no magic formula or calculations that will find gold and silver. Its all due to being in the right place (where it was dropped) and a good deal of luck. Don't make it into a job, just have fun.
Ok my friend has a few dainty gold rings...gonna air test em now. Thanks for the feedback:)
 

DBQ Dave

Well-Known Member
#7
I have used the AT PRO. I have recovered numerous silver rings which usually come in at 83 to 85.
I also recovered 4 or 5 gold rings with it.
I remember the numbers that accompanied the gold rings and where the rings were found.
14K X 2, ladies white and yellow wedding bands. The AT PRO registered them at 63 both times.
14K men's yellow wedding band. Larger than the 2 previously mentioned ladies rings. The AT PRO registered it at 65.
These were all water finds.
18K men's yellow gold ring with onyx stone recovered from soil. The AT PRO registered it at 51.
So, as you can see, the numbers are going to vary. I have read posts where the PRO has recovered gold rings in the 40's.
There is a scale on the faceplate of the PRO that shows the range of gold targets.
Unfortunately that range also covers aluminum foil, pop tops, and can slaw. The saving grace is the nickel at 51-52.
There is no specific number assigned to gold targets, only a range of numbers.
You must always remember that the target may actually be multiple targets of different composition. That will also throw target numbers way off.
Wow, the men's 18k was virtually a nickel....Nice surprise for you ...if you were hoping to dig a nickel:) Thanks for the reply:)
 

majakldragon

Well Known Member
Staff member
#8
Thanks for the replies.

Ok my friend has a few dainty gold rings...gonna air test em now. Thanks for the feedback:)
You would be better off tying a long piece of yarn or other strng string through the ring and burying it. The ground will give you a better reading since that will be where your hunting. Using the string insures the ring doesn't get lost.
 

mtbricky

Well-Known Member
#17
If I was digging in the sand on volley ball courts I would dig everything. In fact any solid sounding signal anywhere in the sand (beach, water, etc) I would dig. Too easy not to. I have had very limited success on sand volley ball courts and I have hunted them many times. The are usually heavily hunted due to all the detecting sites out there that identify volley ball courts as high quality hunting spots. Don't forget to check around the edges where people might set their stuff down while they're playing!.
 
#18
I've never used an ATP but whenever I've dug a sterling ring with my White's Eagle II and then the M6, they registered anywhere from 72 to 85 depending on the size and thickness. Gold rings that I've found came in around 18-20 which is the nickel area. Thicker gold would possibly come in higher but I never found thick gold rings.