What kinds of depths are you guys getting?

#1
On coin sized objects, that is. I know that soil conditions make a huge difference, but what is the deepest quarter you have dug? Dime? Penny?
Were you using the stock coil? I have dug dimes at 6", pennies at about the same, and quarters at around 7-8". Just curious what results you guys are getting.
HH
Darren
 

GoGoGopher

Well-Known Member
#2
Depth

There are MANY factors that contribute to your digging coins at over 6"...A Properly set up machine, experience, a GOOD set of headphones, soil conditions, coil used, and luck...
I am of the belief that most modern detectors use much of the same basic circuitry...where the real depth comes from is proper tuning, and coil construction...Some will tell you you need a NEW machine to get depth...I have seen 15 year old machines get the same depth that a new machine can reach. I have hit dimes at 14" with my QXT Pro...It is not every day I can do this...My average depth on a dime is about 8-9" on any given day...At 14", the dime will have a steady, but VERY faint whisper, and bounce slightly on the Signagraph...It will show no bars, but stay mostly in Zone 7 (coins)...Wagging the coil very fast right over the pinpoint location will confirm a coin if it sounds the same and keeps the coin reading...This wagging can add about 2" of detection depth with the QXT Pro, and should also work the same way on an XLT. I hunt with Noise Reduction ON, and in Mixed Mode most of the time...Some will tell you to turn Noise Reduction OFF...It is there to make those deep whisper signals more pronounced (by eliminating background noises), so turning it OFF, only defeats it's purpose. A Proper ground balance on any machine is vital to good depth...I never reached over 8" until I got a machine with manual GB, or one like the QXT you have to pump to set...Hope this helps some to achieve greater depths with their machines.

HH,
 

steve07

Well-Known Member
#3
Well.....

From my experience and observation, I noticed that most MDs up to about $400 in price range all have the same depth capabilities!!! The biggest Depth determining factor are coil and circuitry design, these are what determine the overall ability of a detector to find targets.

With all that being said, an average detector using a stock coil in moderate ground should see the following targets with these ranges:

Target size Depth Dime to nickel:4 to 8 inches, Quarter to half dollar:6 to 12 inches, Dollar to fruit jar lid:8 to 16 inches. Knowing your detector and using it properly are the two most important things that you can do to get the best depth and sensitivity out of any machine.

(NOTE: Sensitivity does not equal depth!!! Sensitivity grabs the already present target signal and magnifies it... Depth does not increase, but a signal at the farthest depth that the Metal Detector detects will sound clearer, but if there is any metal trash above the feint target that will sometimes mask out the target that is at a deeper depth...The easiest way to set your Sensitivity is to turn it up until the machine starts to chatter. When the machine chatters, turn the Sensitivity control back until the chatter just goes away. This will give you the maximum sensitivity without any excess noise. If you can turn your Sensitivity control wide open without chatter, leave it there. Your machine will be operating at its maximum power capabilities.)

Some detectors designed for the ultimate depth will be hard for a beginner to use or may be too sensitive to use in trashy areas. Coil size will affect the depth of the detector but may not be suited for a particular type of hunting. The Garrett Ace 250 is a fine example of a good machine, it will have excellent depth, but turn the Sensitivity too high and the machine will chatter and you will actually lose the really good targets...
Environmental factors include just about everything except the detector and coil. Just a few of the things to take into consideration are the following: size and shape of the target, soil conditions, orientation of the target in the ground, Metal content of the target, and any outside interference, such as electrical wires and radio or cell phone traffic. Weather conditions, such as rain-soaked ground or even an incoming thunderstorm, may also play a part in the depth and sensitivity of any detector...


Most metal detectors work by sending out a signal, receiving it back, amplifying the return signal, and deciding whether or not to beep. One way of making the detector more sensitive is to increase the amplification of the return signal. This works well up to a point but can cause a machine to overload the circuits and become chirpy. Another way is to increase the initial signal going out, but once again, too much power and the signal will become unstable. High Output Technology combines the increased transmitted signal and the high gain amplification of the return signal to get the best depth and sensitivity out of our lightweight, compact detectors. When a detector becomes chirpy, the most common reason is the noise to signal ratio. Signal refers to the information being passed through the circuitry and noise is any type of other interference. As the signal is amplified, the noise gets amplified as well. At Tesoro, they use high tolerance components and design them into the circuit to create a lower noise to signal ratio...

Contrary to popular belief, there is no one best frequency for any specific metal or metals. Any VLF-style detector that is operating between 3 and 30 kHz will do a fine job for any type of hunting that is done. Repeat that: "Any VLF-style detector that is operating between 3 and 30 kHz will do a fine job for any type of hunting that is done." This frequency range gives good depth, target separation, and is not overly affected by ground mineralization. (VLF - Very Low Frequency) The ability to pick up good targets and separate trash from goodies is more due to the design of the detector, type of coils used, and several other engineering points that are brought up during the Research & Design phase. Comparing feature points of the detector model to the type of hunting you are planning to use it for will help you more than just comparing frequencies...



I hope this is helpful to someone!!!
 
#5
Well.....

From my experience and observation, I noticed that most MDs up to about $400 in price range all have the same depth capabilities!!! The biggest Depth determining factor are coil and circuitry design, these are what determine the overall ability of a detector to find targets.

With all that being said, an average detector using a stock coil in moderate ground should see the following targets with these ranges:

Target size Depth Dime to nickel:4 to 8 inches, Quarter to half dollar:6 to 12 inches, Dollar to fruit jar lid:8 to 16 inches. Knowing your detector and using it properly are the two most important things that you can do to get the best depth and sensitivity out of any machine.

(NOTE: Sensitivity does not equal depth!!! Sensitivity grabs the already present target signal and magnifies it... Depth does not increase, but a signal at the farthest depth that the Metal Detector detects will sound clearer, but if there is any metal trash above the feint target that will sometimes mask out the target that is at a deeper depth...The easiest way to set your Sensitivity is to turn it up until the machine starts to chatter. When the machine chatters, turn the Sensitivity control back until the chatter just goes away. This will give you the maximum sensitivity without any excess noise. If you can turn your Sensitivity control wide open without chatter, leave it there. Your machine will be operating at its maximum power capabilities.)

Some detectors designed for the ultimate depth will be hard for a beginner to use or may be too sensitive to use in trashy areas. Coil size will affect the depth of the detector but may not be suited for a particular type of hunting. The Garrett Ace 250 is a fine example of a good machine, it will have excellent depth, but turn the Sensitivity too high and the machine will chatter and you will actually lose the really good targets...
Environmental factors include just about everything except the detector and coil. Just a few of the things to take into consideration are the following: size and shape of the target, soil conditions, orientation of the target in the ground, Metal content of the target, and any outside interference, such as electrical wires and radio or cell phone traffic. Weather conditions, such as rain-soaked ground or even an incoming thunderstorm, may also play a part in the depth and sensitivity of any detector...

Most metal detectors work by sending out a signal, receiving it back, amplifying the return signal, and deciding whether or not to beep. One way of making the detector more sensitive is to increase the amplification of the return signal. This works well up to a point but can cause a machine to overload the circuits and become chirpy. Another way is to increase the initial signal going out, but once again, too much power and the signal will become unstable. High Output Technology combines the increased transmitted signal and the high gain amplification of the return signal to get the best depth and sensitivity out of our lightweight, compact detectors. When a detector becomes chirpy, the most common reason is the noise to signal ratio. Signal refers to the information being passed through the circuitry and noise is any type of other interference. As the signal is amplified, the noise gets amplified as well. At Tesoro, they use high tolerance components and design them into the circuit to create a lower noise to signal ratio...

Contrary to popular belief, there is no one best frequency for any specific metal or metals. Any VLF-style detector that is operating between 3 and 30 kHz will do a fine job for any type of hunting that is done. Repeat that: "Any VLF-style detector that is operating between 3 and 30 kHz will do a fine job for any type of hunting that is done." This frequency range gives good depth, target separation, and is not overly affected by ground mineralization. (VLF - Very Low Frequency) The ability to pick up good targets and separate trash from goodies is more due to the design of the detector, type of coils used, and several other engineering points that are brought up during the Research & Design phase. Comparing feature points of the detector model to the type of hunting you are planning to use it for will help you more than just comparing frequencies...

I hope this is helpful to someone!!!
Thanks for this post Steve it was very helpful to me!!! great info. about Sens. on a detector, answered alot of questions on the subject for me.
 

Brian C.

Active Member
#6
I have a couple other detectors, they do not come close to the depth I have done some air testing with the dd coil, 24" off my digging shovel, load an clear. I find the 350 loves old iron, I use the detector in coin then I go back to relic. I really like what I have seen so far.
 
#10
new guy here, and I believe we are talking about the 350. With mine the deepest pennies and dimes I have found have been at about....tops 7" so far. As for a Quarter, I found a 1942 at almost 9" and the strange thing is I also found a 2001 Quarter at 10". I seem to have a lot of trouble finding nickels, however the few I have found the deepest one I remember was only 4". I chalk that up to the fact that ive only found a handful though. Sorry, No halves or dollars yet. OH, by the way, Moisture content of the soil seems to have a big play in the depth with my 350. My deeper finds have all been in soil after it had a good rain the day before. Here lately my finds have been fairly shallow, and i believe that has something to do with the fact is has not rained around here in a few weeks. Hope this was kind of helpful, or may be lets you know about someone else 350.
 

DBG

Well-Known Member
#11
Moisture Content Always plays a big role in Depth.
I got three clad quarters @ 13"
But it was a pocket spill and they were all together.
Single quarters @ 9"-10" in moist ground
is the deepest I've found with the 350 & DD Coil so far.
;):D;)
 

steve07

Well-Known Member
#14
I must have been really having a duh moment when I posted to this thread. Why? I thought I was posting about depth in general, not a specific MD... I must be getting older! LOL
 

sandtrout

Active Member
#15
I do pretty well on my ACE 250 which I use 70% of the time cherry picking parks and schools. I don't really care to dig too deep at my age and am happy at what I get. Clad pennies come in easily at 7". Copper pennies and dimes at 10" Nickels also at 10". Quarters at 12"+. I've been at parks where I found nothing more than 6" deep. After I've gone through with the ACE, I've gone through it again with a Vaquero that's been super tuned or power balanced and the only thing I found was the iron and some aluminum that I discriminated out with the ACE and even it was only at 6" maximum. Sometimes you find nothing past 6" because there's nothing deeper than 6"! My wife has dug 8 nickels, all at 8" - 10" and has told me to "stop with the nickels already...my wrists are starting to hurt!" I think it has something to do with the age of the park.
 

draaiorgel

Well-Known Member
#16
The Garrett Ace range of detectors are very good in general.
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But it does require a lot of practice and patience to get the maximum depth out of them.
With experience the Garrett Ace machines can get close
to detectors costing twice or even 3 times as much.

Garrett is one of the greatest American companies.
salute.gif
 

Casca

Well-Known Member
#17
Steve you just confirmed what I have been thinking and practicing anyway. I think 10" inches is a sweet spot for most machines depending on a lots of things. But odds are you will find most stuff between 3" and 6" inches. No matter the detector, the science is the same and there is limitations. I am still learning the F75 and it can go deep. I dug a penny at elbow depth one day and still didnt believe it myself.

darrenb, I would suggest you use all metal mode with a good Ground Balance for more depth. I do not use disc or notch, and I run my detector in high gain mode, with very lil sensitivity. I dig targets between 1" and 9" inches. I have dug targets deeper, but I have to be wearing a headset and in the mood to do so.

Its good to hear folks getting the same depth, I know my machine is working. Great post Darrenb.
 

DBG

Well-Known Member
#18
OK, I've explained this before, several times over the years, so I'll give it one more shot!!
The ACE machine's are DIGITAL Signal machines, That is the signal being read is either all the way ON or all the way OFF. With that being said, The depth is limited to several contributing factors (Soil moisture, sensitivity setting, ground balancing (mineral content),COIL SIZE, COIL TYPE, User Experience & Patients, Coin or target Orientation (is it lying flat, on edge, or angled),
The large Concentric coils will go the deepest. But for Maximum depth you'll have to have the coil dead center over the target, Because of the cone shape of the electrical field it produces.
An Analog Type Machine WILL have more Depth,i,e... AT PRO in Pro Mode.
It really doesn't a limit on depth.

Now let me explain before I start getting nasty e-mails, LOL.
The better you have an analog machine TUNED the deeper it will detect,
As everyone knows.
As stated above it depends on Proper Ground Balancing, The Most Sensitivity the minerals in the soil will let you run and stay stable. Soil Moisture, Plus Halo Effect (how long the object has been in the ground).
I say these things because I own both An ACE 350, and an AT Pro.
The 350 (with the Super Sniper Coil) is great for TOT LOTS, Cheery Picking, and play grounds.
But it IN NO WAY compares to the AT Pro for depth (in Pro Mode).
 

steve07

Well-Known Member
#19
I agree with you DBG... I don't know anything about the AT Pro and was talking about run of the mill detectors...
Thank you for your input.
 
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